Sunday, 4 October 2015

They Shall Not Pass - The Battle for Cable Street.


On this day  on October 4, 1936, Oswald Mosley's British Union of Fascists attempted to march through East London. They were met by over 100,000 local residents and workers who fought with the fascists and the police  in order to protect their community, which forced the march to be abandoned.
During this time Britain was facing very serious economic problems. Mosley's  fascists held nasty anti-semitic views and tried to blame Jews for the cause of the country's problems. 
Thet were not to be welcomed, instead at Gardners' Court they were met by thousands of protestors, waving banners with slogans such as 'They shall not Pass'( no pasaron, famous republican slogan from the Spanish Civil War) , 'No Nazis here' and 'East End Unite.'
Uniformed policemen on horseback were employed to allow Mosley's  march to pass through. However anti-fascists blocked the route by barricading the street with rows of domestic furniture and the police were attacked with eggs, rotten fruit and the contents of peoples chamber pots.Local kids rolled marbles under police horses hooves. A mighty battle ensued, leaving many arrested and injured. Eighty years ago today it saw thousands of people, united, from many walks of life, local Jews, communists, socialists, anarchists and Irish groups standing firm  as one in the battle against fascism, who worked together to prevent Oswald Mosley's fascists from marching through a Jewish area in London.
The end result was the fascists did not get to march and they did not pass, and were left in humiliation so today we look back on this living history in celebration and pride. We should never forget. We might like to think those days are behind us, but anti-semitism, racism and intolerance against Muslims is on the rise. The far-right are growing throughout Europe. After seventy nine year we must remain vigilant to this. We should never forget events like the battle of Cable Street. Teach your kids about it.




video Ghosts of Cable Street, set to the music of Men they couldn't hang



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